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Memorial Day Celebrations (1910-1919)

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The Evening Star, May 30, 1910
Senator from Idaho Congressional Orator
Junior Vice Commander J.D. Bloodgood in Charge of the Exercises


In charge of the impressive ceremonies held in Congressional cemetery in Southeast Washington today was J.D. Bloodgood, junior vice commander of the Department of the Potomac, G.A.R. Assisting him were the following members of the committee on arrangements: J.O. Estabrook, commander Farragut Post, No. 10; W.F. Brehizer, H.H. Bunyea, E.H. Ripley, John Shaw, James Wood, P.J. Cooksey, Stanton Weaver, George R. Cook and P.C. George.

The sounding of "assembly" and "reveille" called the assemblage to order at 10 o'clock this forenoon. After an opening air by the Untied States Engineer Band, the choir, band and auditors gave "Nearer, My God, to Thee," and Junior Vice Department Commander Bloodgood made the introductory address. The invocation was by Rev. A.W. Spooner, pastor of the Sixth Presbyterian Church, Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn sang, with choir accompaniment, "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground." Charles E. Harris read Lincoln's address at Gettysburg. Dr. W. Bruce Hoofnagle and the choir sang the recessional, and Mrs. B.H. Smart gave as a soprano solo, "Our Heroes Sleeping Shall Never March Again."

A warm welcome greeted Senator W.B. Heyburn of Idaho, the orator of the occasion, as he was presented to the audience by Mr. Bloodgood as the soldier's friend.

Senator Heyburn's Tribute
Senator Heyburn said:
"The purpose of this Memorial day is not to revive feelings of bitterness between either the sections of the people of our united country. It is to commemorate the sacrifices of the lives of those who died to save the Union that we stand here today, and the patriotic people all over this fair land stand in this hour with heads bowed in reverence of the sacrifices they made. When the war was drawing to a close the loyal people renewed their pledge of faith in their great leader, Abraham Lincoln, and Lincoln stood at the shrine of liberty to renew his pledge to the people to bind up the nation's wounds, 'to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and orphan.'

"To this pledge we are bound and we will keep the faith. The wounds of war are not all of the flesh and bone. There is to be taken into account the lost time of the young men who left the schoolroom and the college and entered the army, there to serve their country at the sacrifice of opportunity to finish their education and equipment for the duties of industrial life. They could not so readily pick up the lines of life, and hundreds of thousands of young men who would have entered upon its duties well equipped by education to take and maintain leading parts in life found that lost time and the results of the camp life had cost them their opportunity and that they must go through life without the advantages of the education and equipment they missed while serving their country. These wounds have never entirely healed and must always be taken into consideration in estimating the old soldier. His wounds are not all of the flesh."

The United States Engineer Band playing "Inflammatus," from "Stabat Mater" at the conclusion of Senator Heyburn's address. Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn sang "The Best of the Brave," Mrs. Nellie Southard gave as a soprano solo "The Flag of Morning Skies" the audience sang "America," Rev. A.W. Spooner gave the benediction and an army bugler sounded "taps." A section of a United States field battery fired the national salute.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies at Congressional cemetery the veterans and auditors proceeded to the Pennsylvania avenue bridge southeast, where above the Eastern branch of the Potomac solemn memorial services were held for the sailor dead, who "are confined in the vasty deep."


The Evening Star, May 30, 1911

Representative Winfield S. Hammond of Minnesota delivered the principal address at the services held at Congressional cemetery under the direction of the Rev. N.H. Miller, junior vice department commander, and committees of the G.A.R., United Spanish War Veterans and Woman's Relief Corps. An address also was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Miller, while Lincoln's Gettysburg address was read by Miss Belva Laughlin. Music by the United States Engineer Band, choir selections by the choir of the Metropolitan Baptist Church and several solos made up the rest of the program. The invocation and benediction were pronounced by the Rev. George P. Wilson of Northminster Presbyterian Church and by the Rev. Mr. Miller.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1912
Says Unmarked Graves Show Victorious Path
Former Representative Irwin Speaks at the Congressional Cemetery


Drawing a word picture of the "Silent city of the dead" and its lessons to the living, former Representative Harry S. Irwin of Louisville in the oration at the exercises in Congressional Cemetery today paid a tribute "to those in the unmarked graves along the victorious pathway of our banner, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, and from the Missouri to the sea."

The victory of the Union soldiers, he said, solved the problem, "demonstrating that there is no chain of mountains tall enough, no rivers broad enough or deep enough to constitute a boundary between two separate nationalities carved out of the American republic." He also made an appeal to "living comrades to strive for the higher destiny awaiting the good soldier in the cause of righteousness and truth.

Program of the ExercisesThe full program follows: Reveille and assembly (10 a.m.) band bugler; Largo from Xerxes (Handel), United States Engineers' Band (Julius Kamper, chief musician); "Nearer, My God, to Thee," choir, band and assembly; invocation, Rev. John C. Ball, pastor Metropolitan Baptist Church; introduction, junior vice department commander; "Words by a Veteran," John Shaw, commander Farragut Post; "To Thee, O Country" (Eichberg), choir; Edward H. Grove, introducing George W. Sollers, son of a veteran; "The Rosary" (Nevin), band; Lincoln's Gettysburg address, Mrs. Belle C. Harris; soprano solo, "The Rest of the Brave" (Calver and Moore), Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn; oration; "Album Leaf" (Wagner), band; "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," Mrs. A.G. Dunn and choir; "America," choir, band and assembly; benediction, junior vice commander; taps, George C. Fugitt.

At the conclusion of the program services in memory of the sailor dead were held at the Pennsylvania Avenue bridge by the Farragut Women's Relief Corps.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1913
Patriotic Music is Sung by Metropolitan Choir
At Congressional Cemetery


Thirteen feminine and eight masculine singers, comprising the choir of Metropolitan Baptist Church, sang an elaborate program of patriotic songs at the Memorial day exercises at Congressional cemetery this morning. William E. Andrews, auditor of the Treasury Department, delivered the oration.

Mr. Andrews said, in part:
"When I was traveling in the Carolinas a few years ago some of the members of our party pointed out the locations of important battles. What must have been the actual condition and appearance of things at the close of the strife? As I thought of it I was impressed with the idea that people of the south had made wonderful achievements, displayed remarkable courage in rising from the low plane of broken spirits and saddened hearts to the prosperous conditions of today. The merits and demerits of the principles involved in that conflict may stand aside for a moment while you and I join in congratulations to the people of that section of our country upon the achievements that they have made.

"In this spirit I know that none of us can join or will join quite as heartily as the boys in blue, and I am sure that from their hearts there will go genuine fraternal greeting to their former opponents as they clasp hands in concord and peace."

The exercises began at 10 o'clock, when reveille and assembly were sounded by the bugler of the Engineer Band. L.B. Patterson, junior vice department commander, G.A.R., directed the program. The Engineer Band, under direction of George A. Wintermeyer, principal musician, played the music for the occasion.

Rev. N.H. Holmes, department chaplain, opened the exercises with the invocation. Vice Commander Patterson made some introductory remarks. Lincoln's Gettysburg address was read by Capt. James E. Maynard of the United Spanish War Veterans. Capt. William F. Daly, chief aid to Commander-in-chief Beers, gave a patriotic recitation.

Program of Patriotic Songs
"Nearer, My God, to Thee" and "America" were sung by the choir and assembly, to band accompaniment. Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, assisted by the choir, sang "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground." The choir sang Eichberg's "To Thee, My Country."

The personnel of the choir was as follows:
Sopranos: Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn, Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, Miss Nellie Barber, Mrs. James M. Brooks, Miss Frances Guschewsky, Miss Rose Riedl, Miss Arline Furtner, Miss Nellie Kunz, Miss Rachel Fleharty and Miss May Hilt.
Altos: Miss Emma Guschewsky, Mrs. Daniel Shankle and Miss Laura V. French.
Tenors: Roland E. Fleharty, Montie Presgrave, Gooch Meyers and Edgar Kellogg.
Basses: Gilbert A. Clark, Clifford M. Woetendyke, James M. Brooks and Dr. J. Lester Brooks.
Organist: Miss Ethelyn Callaway
Director: Gilbert A. Clark

Committees in Charge
The committees in charge of the exercises were:

Committee of arrangements: A.F. Dinsmore, commander of Farragut Post, No. 10, G.A.R., chairman; Thomas A. Green, commander of Henry W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, United Spanish War Veterans, vice chairman; H.H. Bunyea, secretary; John Jost, F.J. Cooksey, J.O. Estabrook, Stanton Weaver, George R. Cook and S.W. Bunyea.>/p>

Cemetery committee: J.T. Earnshaw, superintendent of cemetery, chairman; P.J. Cooksey, vice chairman; J.O. Estabrook, Edward Kergan, George R. Cook, James B. Peat and B.F. Rickenbacker.

Committee of Farragut Post: A.F. Dinsmore, Frank Blagg, William H. Wilson, Stanton Weaver, P.J. Cooksey, James Wood, George R. Cook, W.F. Brenizer, S.W. Bunyea, J.O. Estabrook, George C. Acton, P.C. George, J.C. Neff, H.H. Bunyea, W.H. Caslow, J.W. Foster, John Jost, E.H. Bury and W.F. Dove.

Lawton Camp, United Spanish War Veterans: Thomas A. Green, commander; Charles A. Williams, vice commander; Lee H. Harris, junior vice commander; George F. Burdick, adjutant; James B. Peat, quartermaster; Edwin M. Lawton, chaplain; Sheridan Ferree, officer of the day; Edward Kergan, officer of the guard; J. Farzer, W.P. Rickenbacker and W.P. Davis.

Farragut Women's Relief Corps: Mrs. Jennie Parker, president; Elizabeth Bradley, Jessie H. Bruner, Emma S. Kibbey, Sarah McDonald, Fannie E. Pratt, Mary Walling, Mary P. Ripley, Mary Wood, Annie Price, Sarah J. Albert, Mary A. Dow, Ida Bitz, Annie Davis, Mary J. Hayghe, Georgiana Loane, Sophia Shilling, Ida McKinney, Addie W. Foster, Melissa Crowell, Belle C. Harris, Bernice G. Mattoon, Fannie M. Page, Ella Morgan, Amelia Farling, Ida Stalker, Mary O. Harrover, Etta Harrover, Mary Van Ness, Margaret Foote, A.V. Ellis, Sarah M. Calder, Agner Welden and Hettie H. Fague.

The Evening Star, May 30, 1914
Rev. Paul Hickok is Orator
Hazard Wheeler the Director


Memorial day exercises were carried on at Congressional cemetery today, beginning at 10 a.m., under the direction of Hazard Wheeler, junior vice department commander, with the following commands participating Farragut Post, No. 10, W.F. Brenizer, commander, and Henry W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, United Spanish War Veterans; Lee H. Harris, commander, President's Own Garrison, No. 104, A. and N.U.; Admiral George Dewey Naval Camp, No. 7, U.S.W.V., and Col. James S. Petit Camp, No. 3, U.S.W.V.

Program of Exercises
The program was follows: Reveille and assembly, band bugler; selection, United States Engineers' Band, Frank J. Weber, chief musician and leader; invocation, Chaplain John Elliott; "Nearer, My God, to Thee," choir, band and assembly; remarks, Hazard Wheeler, junior vice department commander, chairman; chorus, "To Thee, O Country" (Eichberg), choir; reading Gen. John A. Logan's general order establishing Memorial day, Commander Hazard Wheeler; soprano solo, "Oh, Starry Flagg" (Calver Tucker), Mrs. Arthur Dunn; reading Lincoln's Gettysburg address, Adjt. Stanton Weaver; "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark and choir; oration, Rev. Paul R. Hickok; selection, United States Engineers' Band; "America," choir, band and assembly; benediction, Rev. Paul Hickok, and taps, bugler.

The choir of the Metropolitan Baptist Church, composed as follows, assisted:
Sopranos: Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn, Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, Miss Nellie Barber, Mrs. James M. Brooks, Miss Frances Guschewsky, Miss Nellie Kunz, Miss Elsie Schooley, Miss Lillian Kephart.
Altos: Miss Emma Guschewsky, Miss Lesta Henderson, Miss Edith Beatty, Mrs. G. Fred Thompson, Miss Hattie Noel.
Tenors: Harold King, Albert F. Cummins, Evans rooks, Walter N. Presgraves, Rolland E. Fleharty.
Basses: Gilbert A. Clark, William T. Ellis, G. Fred Thompson, Gilbert C. Clark, James M. Brooks, Dr. J. Lester Brooks. Organist: Mrs. G. Fred Thompson Director: Gilbert A. Clark

Committees in Charge
The committees in charge were:

Cemetery committee-J.T. Earnshaw, superintendent of cemetery, chairman; P.J. Cooksey, vice chairman; J.O. Estabrook, Edward Kergan, George R. Cook, James B. Peat and B.P. Rickenbacker.

Committee of Farragut Post-W.F. Brenizer, commander; Frank Blagg, William H. Wilson, Stanton Weaver, P.J. Cooksey, James Wood, George R. Cook, J.O. Estabrook, George C. Acton, P.C. George, J.C. Neff, H.H. Bunyea, W.H. Caslow, J.W. Foster, John Jost, E.B. Bury, W.F. Dove, A.F. Dinsmore and E.H. Ripley.

Committee of Col. James S. Pettit Camp, No. 3-H. Dasher, J.G. Faust, D.L. Ford, August Greisel, H.J. Lockling, J.L. May, H.B. Myers, A.M. Russell, H.J. Zimmerman, R.H. Wood, W.B. Hudson and M.E. Willard.

Farragut Woman's Relief Corps, No. 5-Ella L. Morgan, president; Ida L. McKinney, Belle C. harris, Fannie Pratt, Mary A. Dow, Emma S. Kibbey, Mary P. Ripley, Melissa Crowell, Jennie Parker, Mary A. VanNess, Elizabeth Bradley, Jessie Bruner, Addie W. Foster, Sophia Shilling, Georgianna Loane, Mary J. Hayghe, Annie M. Davis, Sarah J. Albert, Amelia Farling, Mary Harrover, Fannie M. Page, Ida Stalker, Etta Harrover, Bernice Mattoon, Margaret Foote, Alice V. Ellis, Agnes Welding, Hettie H. Fague, Mary Wood, Annie Price, Jennie H. Parker, Sarah McDonald, Mary Walling and Ida Bitz.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1915
Patriotism of Peace Theme at Congressional Cemetery


department commander, Stanton Weaver, with members of the following organizations participating: Farragut Post, No. 10, G.A.R., Frank Blagg, commander; Gen. H.W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, United Spanish War Veterans and William B. Cushing Camp, No. 30, Sons of Veterans, O.J. Velly, commander.

Reveille and assembly were sounded at 10 o'clock and after a selection by the United States Engineers Band, invocation was asked by Rev. G. LeRoy White. The assembly then joined with the choir of Metropolitan Baptist Church in singing "Nearer, My God, to Thee."

After remarks appropriate to the occasion by Junior Vice Department Commander Stanton Weaver and the singing of "To Thee, O Country" by the choir, Gen. John A. Logan's order establishing Memorial day was read by Vice Commander Weaver. Soprano solos were sung by Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn and Miss Nellie Southard. Lincoln's Gettysburg address was read by Gurnon R. Scott of Cushing Camp, No. 30, Sons of Veterans, and Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark and the choir sang "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground."

Address by Rev. F.M. McCoy
The oration of the day was delivered by Rev. Francis M. McCoy of Waugh Methodist Episcopal Church, who said in part:

"As we strew with flowers the graves of our beloved dead we are hushed into a calm consideration of the awful cost incident to war and feel that the new and great problem of our day is to find a better way in which to realize the ends sought in war.

"The patriotism of war is unquestioned in its sincerity. No one can doubt the genuineness of that loyalty which will voluntarily face the cannons' glare and the bayonets' bristling front for the interests of posterity. We do honor today to this deep devotion that will lay down its life for its friend. This type of patriotism has been in large measure the purchase price of both defense and of progress in the past. It was this love of country that caused these men to march forth and offer themselves, as a final offering within their power, upon the altar of freedom and a united nation. It is well that we pause beside the graves of our fathers so that the youth of our land may gain a new conception of the cost of the heritage which they enjoy.

"We honor the true patriotism of war as exemplified here by these brave dead; but there lifts before us also an estimate of the patriotism of peace. This is the measure of the best type of citizenship. He who possesses himself under stress is greater than he who takes a city. The calm poise that knows all the facts and yet hopefully puts a staying hand upon the hasty sword is just as heroic as the patriotism that would rush into battle. This is the type of the citizenship of the new day. Brotherhood is the great reality for nations. We owe it to the bleeding lands across the sea and to our southwest to keep strong in peace so that we may be ready to reach out a helping hand in the trying years of reconstruction. The finest patriotism is that which would spare the country the misery incident to war and help it by the strength of peace. We stand ready if patriotism calls to sacrifice; we pray that we may remain free to serve."

"America" Is Sung
The choir and assembly then joined in singing "America," after which benediction was pronounced by Rev. G. LeRoy White. The sounding of taps by a bugler brought the exercises to a close.

Members of the choir of Metropolitan Baptist Church who participated in the exercises were:
Sopranos: Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn, Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, Mrs. J. Lester Brooks, Miss Ethelyn Callaway, Miss Frances Guschewsky, Mrs. Milton Prosperi, Miss Nellie Kunz, Miss Elsie Schooley and Miss Lillian Kephart.
Altos: Miss Emma Guschewsky, Miss Lesta Henderson, Miss hattie Noel and Miss Mary Maranda.
Tenors: Harold King, Albert F. Cummins, Evans Brooks, James M. Richardson and Roland E. Fleharty.
Basses: Gilbert A. Clark, Gilbert C. Clark, G. Fred Thompson and James M. Brooks.
Organist: Mrs. G. Fred Thompson
Director: Gilbert A. Clark

Committees in Charge
Committees which arranged for the exercises were as follows:

Cemetery committee-J.T. Earnshaw, superintendent of cemetery, chairman; P.J. Cooksey, vice chairman; J.O. Estabrook, George R. Cook, Emil Walter, N.P. Davis and B.C. Farrar.

Committee of Farragut Post-Frank Blagg, commander; William H. Wilson, Stanton Weaver, P.J. Cooksey, James Wood, George R. Cook, J.O. Estabrook, P.C. George, H.H. Bunyea, W.H. Caslow, J.W. Foster, John Jost, E.B. Bury, A.F. Dinsmore, Clark Arnold, F.A. Belt, C.E. Boles, W.F. Brenzier, G.W. Dove, Edwin A. Davis, William Frost, J.C. Gaither, J.F. Gordon, George A. Henderson, G.W. Hill, Daniel M. Miller, Isaac norris, David Parker, Terrell Pattison, John Shaw, Charles A. Fields and D.H. Yount.

Committee of Henry W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, Spanish War Veterans-Commander Emil Walker, William P. Davis and Bertie C. Farrar.

Farragut Woman's Relief Corps, No. 5-Mary O. Harrover, president; Ida L. McKinney, Belle C. Harris, Fannie Pratt, Mary A. Dow, Emma S. Kibbey, Mary P. Ripley, Melissa Crowell, Jennie Parker, Mary A. Van Ness, Elizabeth Bradley, Addie W. Foster, Sophia Silling, Georgianna Loane, Mary J. Hayghe, Annie M. Davis, Sarah J. Albert, Amelia Farling, Fannie M. Page, Ida Stalker, Etta Harrover, Bernice Hefferman, Margaret Foote, Alice V. Ella, Agnes Welding, Hettie H. Fague, Mary Wood, Annie Price, Jennie H. Parker, Sarah McDonald, Mary Walling and Ida Bitz.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1916
For World-Wide Enduring Peace
Representative Frear Hopes U.S. Will Point Way to Broader Humanity
Is Memorial Day A Topic in Address to Veterans
Program of Exercises Today in Congressional Cemetery--
Music by Soloists and Church Choir


"On this Memorial day it is well for the greatest nation in the world to point the way to a broader, higher humanity. A greater work likes before the world and before this government than has ever voiced the complaints of humanity. Instead of surrendering our energies and lifework to the settlement of changing economic problems that are insignificant in comparison to the lives of men and nations, it remains for our government to find some way toward a world-wide enduring peace."

This sentiment when expressed by Representative James A. Frear, the orator of the day in Congressional cemetery, won enthusiastic applause from several hundred auditors. This applause was renewed a few moments later, when Mr. Frear again said: "The flowers we bring today fade and wither, but the debt of gratitude we owe you veterans will be fresh and living long after the veteran has passed away. You have lived to see the divided house reunited, and to see the greatest and most powerful nation of the world welded out of that same broken republic which you helped to save."

Reviews Country's Development
Mr. Frear, in opening his address, recalled that fifteen years ago on this memorial anniversary he addressed a gathering of veterans here in Washington and expressed the hope that never again would "the shadow of another great war fall upon the face of the earth." After reviewing the development of this country since then, and paying respect to the debt of gratitude which the nation owes to the Union defenders in the civil war, he called attention to the fact that:

"War and desolation were never so widespread in the history of the world as it is today. Within two short years millions of boys have given up their lives or have been sent out in the world blind, maimed or wrecked human hulks, to be driven before the storm.

"I am not ready to conceive," he said, "that the people of this age and of this country are impotent to save us from appeals to bloodshed and violence. If reason has been throttled today wile war holds sway ours is the power and influence to restore reason and raise a protective barrier against the rule of madness now or hereafter."

Hope for the Future
Hope for the future and that the United States will play a leading part in the pacification of the entire world was expressed by Representative Frear as follows:

"History is written in epochs, in centuries, no days, and whatever the record yet to be written, nothing will dim the luster of the page which this day commemorates. No chapter of the last century will be more potent in the history of the world than the record of that war fought for the establishment of universal freedom, for a broad universal peace.

"We are not permitted to look into the future, to see behind the veil, but if so I firmly believe we would see a living promise of world peace not resting on force of arms, but upon an agreement of nations. That is the only enduring peace and, strange anomaly, it will be made imperative by reason of the wars that nave been waged, including that fought and won by the boys in blue for the abolition of slavery and for the Union.

Foresees Court of Arbitration
"Six years ago four of the most powerful nations of the world, Germany, France, Great Britain and the United States, prepared a draft for the organization of a court of arbitration. That court will be established before another decade has passed--a court where governmental differences will be heard and determined by agreement--not force of arms. That is not the dream of idealism, it is the stern force of circumstances for the world wants enduring peace, just as the individual demands peace.

"God gave the world a Lincoln in its hour of need. He placed the lowliest on the highest seat, not to preach war, but the doctrine of liberty--of peace and good will toward men, even as the Carpenter's son had preached eighteen centuries before. Not war but peace must be the ideal of every nation, and that spirit is manifest today. It will come from out the crucible of this world-wide war, which teaches us that the ultimate ambition of man or nations must not be war, but honorable and lasting peace."

Other Features of Program
The exercises in Congressional cemetery were under the direction of Junior Vice Department Commander, A.H. Freer, with Farragut Post, No. 10, of which P.J. Cooksey is commander, and J.T. Earnshaw superintendent of the cemetery. Other events on the program were: "Invocation, Rev. F.M. McCoy; chorus, "Brave Hearts, Sleep On" (Parks), choir: Lincoln's Gettysburg address, Miss Naoma Ruth McCoy; "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark and choir; soprano solo, "O Starry Flag" (Calver-Tucker), Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn; oration, Rev. F.M. McCoy; "America," choir and assembly, and benediction, Rev. F.M. McCoy.

The music was furnished by the choir of Metropolitan Baptist Church, under the direction of Gilbert A. Clark. The choir consists of:
Sopranos--Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn, Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, Mrs. J. Lester Brooks, Mrs. Milton H. Prosperi, Mrs. James M. Brooks, Miss Frances Guschewsky, Miss Elsie Schooley, Miss Lillian Kephart and Miss Geneva Dillon.
Altos--Miss Emma Guschewsky, Miss Lesta Henderson, Miss Hattie Noel and Mrs. Daniel C. Shankle.
Tenors--George V. Blakney, Harold King, Albert F. Cummins, James M. Richardson, Rolland E. Fleharty and Charles F. Johnson.
Bassos--Gilbert A. Clark, G. Fred Thompson, James M. Brooks and William Keeler.
Organist--Mrs. G. Fred Thompson.

Committee in Charge
The committee in charge of the exercises were as follows:

From Farragut Post--J.C. Neff, W.H. Caslow, Frank Blagg, John Jost, James Wood, George R. Cook, P.C. George, H.H. Bunyea, A.F. Dinsmore and John Shaw.

From Farragut Woman's Relief Corps--Mary Harrover, president: Melissa Crowell, Sophia Shilling, Mary P. Ripley, Eleanor L. Morgan, Etta E. Harrower, Amelia Falling, J. Elizabeth Bradley, Georgiana Loane, Fannie E. Pratz, Ida L. Stalker, Belle C. Harris, Jennie Parker, Alice V. Ellis, Lula I. Waters, Mary P. VanNess, Bessie M. Hefferman, Margaret Foote, Sarah J. Albert, Emma S. Ribley, Sarah McDonald, Mary A. Dow, Ida G. McKinney and Fannie M. Page.

The Evening Star, May 30, 1917
America's Part in World War Is Touched Upon by Speaker


The unitedness of the country, forgetful of hyphenates and concentrated on support of the nation's stand for liberty and the duty of the citizens to give moral, financial and physical strength in defense of the government's part in the world war were emphasized in a patriotic oration by Representative Ernest Lundeen of Minnesota, at the ceremonies in the Congressional Cemetery. The program was under the direction fo Junior Vice Department Commander H.B. Snyder, with Henry B. Lawton Camp, No. 4, United Spanish War Veterans, John Farner, commander; former members of Farragut Post, No. 10, and Farragut Women's Relief Corps, No. 5, Amelia Failing, president. The general committee consisted of H.B. Snyder, junior vice department commander, chairman; A.F. Dinsmore, past department commander; John Farner, commander, H.W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, U.S.W.V., and Mrs. Melissa D. Crowell, vice president W.R.C., vice chairman; H.H. Bunyea, secretary.

The music was a particular feature. There was a concert by the United States Engineer Band, under direction of Frank J. Weber, chief musician and leader, with twenty-eight members, accompanied by the choir of Metropolitan Baptist Church. Those who led the gathering in singing the national anthem and other patriotic songs, under the direction of Gilbert A. Clark, with Mrs. G. Fred Thompson as organist, were:
Sopranos-Mrs. J. Lester Brooks, Miss Ethelyn Callaway, Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark, Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn, Mrs. James M. Brooks, Miss Marian George, Miss F.L. Guschewsky, Mrs. M.H. prosperi, Miss Elsie Schooley, Miss C.E. Whittington, Miss Lillian Kephart.
Altos-Miss E.A. Guschewsky, Miss Lesta Henderson, Miss Hattie F. Noell, Mrs. Daniel C. Chankle.
Tenors-C. Evans Brooks, George V. Blakeney, Albert F. Cummins, Harold S. King.
Bassos-Gilbert A. Clark, Harold Burton, G. Fred Thompson, James M. Brooks.

Tribute to Departed Sailors
A pretty ceremony was the strewing of flowers on the water, in remembrance of departed sailors, from the bridge by school children, under the auspices of Farragut Post, Woman's Relief Corps, No. 5, while the national salute was fired.

The soldiers' graves were strewn with flowers by school children, directed by Mrs. Melissa D. Crowell and under the auspices of Henry W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, United Spanish War Veterans. Flowers were planted on the graves by the Boy Scouts, under the direction of P.J. Cooksey, representing Henry W. Lawton Camp.

In the formal program the ceremony of presenting the flag was conducted by Albert J. Hawkins, U.S.W.V., officer of the day. This was followed by the pledge of allegiance and the rendering of "The Star Spangled Banner" by the band, while the choir and assembly sang.

The invocation and benediction were pronounced by Rev. John Weidley. The order of the day was read by H.H. Bunyea, adjutant; the ritual address by H.B. Snyder, J.V.C.; reading of Gen. John A. Logan's first Memorial day order by John Farmer, commander, U.S.W.V., and the reading of Lincoln's Gettysburg address by W.P. Davis, U.S.W.V. Mrs. Arthur G. Dunn and Mrs. Gilbert A. Clark contributed solos.

Committees in Charge
The celebration was in charge of these committees:

Cemetery-J.T. Earnshaw, superintendent of cemetery, chairman; P.J. Cooksey, vice chairman; George R. Cook, Waren T. Brenizer and J.O. Estabrook.

Flower-John Farner, commander U.S.W.V., chairman; Melissa D. Crowell, vice chairman; Mary A. Dow, Etta Harrover and Eleanor L. Morgan.

Stand-P.J. Cooksey, chairman; Emil Walter, vice chairman; Isaac Norris, C.W. Kline and Jacob Karbaugh.

Decoration-Henry W. Lawton Camp, No. 4, U.S.W.V.

Committee for former members of Farragut Post, No. 10, G.A.R.-A.F. Dinsmore, P.J. Cooksey, David Parker, J.O. Estabrook, F.A. Belt, E.A. Davis, J.T. Gordon, H.H. Bunyea, J.C. Gaitner, W.T. Brenizer, Isaac Norris, D.H. Yount, G.R. Cook and W.T. Patterson.

Committee, Farragut Women's Relief Corps, No. 5-E. Amelia Failing, president; Melissa D. Crowell, vice president; Mary A. Harrover, department president; Elizabeth Bradley, Mary A. Dow, Louisa Harrover, Emma S. Kibby, Ida L. McKinney, Eleanor Morgan, Jennie H. Parker, Sophia Silling, Ida Stalker, Eva Redman, Sarah J. Gilbert, Etta Harrover, Catherine Clabaugh, Georgianna Laone, Bernice Hefferman, Fannie Pratt, Mary P. Ripley, Cassie Sutherland and Mary A. VanNess.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1918
Tribute is Paid to Heroes Who Died for Nation
Americans of All Classes Gather at Cemeteries
to Honor the Dead
President Attends Arlington Services
Chief Thought Centers on Present World Conflict
in Paying Respect to War Veterans


Americans, including the nation's chief executive, members of the Senate and House of Representatives, high government officials, veterans of former wars waged by the United States, down to the humblest citizens of the land, participated today in exercises and ceremonies in memory of those who laid down their lives for liberty.

Not alone was the day given over to memorials for those who died in earlier wars and in internecine strife, but those men and women who have passed beyond in the present world struggle received the heartfelt tributes of a grateful nation.

In compliance with the President's proclamation the day took on an added significance and solemnity as a day of national humiliation and prayer, though in all of the tributes and orations there was sounded a note of calm confidence and high resolve that the objects to attain which the nation became a participant and cobelligerent in the titanic world struggle shall be achieved.

Chief Interest at Arlington
Chief interest centered in the exercises at Arlington national cemetery, attended by the President of the United States and held under the auspices of the veterans of the war between the states. Memorial exercises for the dead of the battleship Maine were also held at the Maine memorial in Arlington.

At the Battle Ground national cemetery, officials of the District government participated in the exercises. Elaborate ceremonies were held at the Soldiers Home cemetery, in Congressional cemetery, and in all of the burying places in the District where lie the bones of those who defended the nation in its days of stress and strife.


The Evening Star, May 30, 1919
Spanish War Veterans Assist in Exercises
Services Are Held at Congressional Cemetery
Capt. Daniel V. Chisholm Praises heroes


Memorial exercises were held this morning at Congressional cemetery under the direction of Junior Vice Department Commander Frederick W. Archibald, assisted by Gen. M. Emmet Urell Camp, No. 9, United Spanish War Veterans, Richard Hooker, jr., commander; the ladies of the Women's Relief Corps and the Ladies' Auxiliary of Gen. M. Emmet Urell Camp, No. 9, United Spanish War Veterans.

Capt. Daniel V. Chisholm, past commander-in-chief of the United Spanish War Veterans was the orator. The Metropolitan Baptist Church choir, under the leadership of Gilbert A. Clark, sang, and the United States Engineers' Band played. Miss Ethel Coffin was organist for the choir.

"Soldiers and sailors of our wars, we stand before you today with bowed and uncovered heads, because we know the great debt we owe you." Said Capt. Chisholm. "Our Constitution still stands as a model to other nations. You fought to uphold it. Our Union of states is still secure. You offered your lives to preserve it. Our government still stands. It was good enough for you to fight for; it was good enough for your comrades, whose graves are being decorated today, to die for; it was good enough for our mothers to pray and suffer for, and it is good enough for every true and loyal American citizen.

We have but one prayer today, and that is that the Stars and Stripes, our flag, may always remain what you fought to make it--the true emblem of liberty and a protection to every American citizen in every part of the civilized world."

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